Wooden blinds in a clean white home

Wooden blinds are an investment piece for your home. Ensure you pick the perfect model with our complete guide to choosing, styling, ordering and fitting this best-loved blind style.

 

Wooden blinds (or venetian blinds) are the shade of choice for style-conscious homeowners. Revered for their clean lines, neutral look and enhanced privacy options, wooden blinds offer both style and practical benefits for buyers.

 

All wooden venetian blinds offer the same shading functionality. The blinds can be adjusted for better light control. They can be opened to let in full light, and closed to block the light using a cord. However, unlike other blind styles, wooden blinds also feature a second control cords. Tilting this when the blind is closed or partially closed tilts the slats and lets in filtered light, while still maintaining privacy. It’s this enhanced shading that makes wooden blinds so popular.

 

With several design features available for venetians it can be tricky to suss out the benefits of each choice, so we’ve created a simple guide that outlines the whats and whys of each option. We’ve also listed advice on wooden blinds by room, and measuring and installation advice for ordering and fitting your new blinds.

 

 

Image credit: @sophie_shakespeare on Instagram

Wooden Blind Design Options

 

The beauty of wooden blinds is that they can be used to complement or contrast any decor and style. Not only are they beautiful, but they’re also practical and can be used in just about any room. Here, we’ll show you some of the different design options when it comes to wooden blinds.

 

With or Without Tapes

 

Wood venetian blinds can be ordered either with or without tapes, and the price difference between them is negligible. ‘Tapes’ are cotton strips of fabric that run the vertical length of the blind where it is strung, concealing the internal rigging.

 

They can match or complement the blind colour and the colour scheme of a room. You can choose from colors like alabaster, dove grey and dark grey to a wide range of neutrals including deep browns, noirs and whites.

 

Decorative tapes are very much on-trend thanks in part to their popularity with Instagram home interior accounts. Fans of embossed tapes appreciate the way they soften the look of the blind and add a fabric texture that helps the blind better match soft furnishings. On large areas such as picture windows, tapes may be beneficial as they provide a visual break from lengthy slats.

 

However, no-tape styles still have a strong fanbase. Blinds without tapes have a crisper look that suits contemporary interiors well. This style is also easier to dust, and many feel no-fabric blinds are more hygienic in high-soilage areas like kitchens. On smaller areas, uninterrupted slats visually lengthen the width of the window, making a grander statement.

 

35mm or 50mm slats

 

Wooden blinds come in a choice of two slat width sizes, 35mm or 50mm. The standard size is 50mm, which can be considered the ‘default’ size. As there are fewer slats in 50mm wood blinds, they allow more light through when the blinds are closed but tilted open for light flow, which makes for a lighter room.

 

35mm slats are the best option for narrow window recesses, where installation may be a problem with a broader blind. As there are more slats, they also make rooms slightly darker, which may be the preference in bedrooms or sunrooms.

 

 

Image credit: @baytree_house on Instagram

 

There is no difference in cost between the two slat sizes — just choose whichever is best for you.

 

Real or Faux Wood

 

Real wood blinds are made from hardwoods including light oak, walnut, cherry and basswood — commonly used in guitars and canoes. Faux wooden blinds are made with PVC. The PVC is then cast with a woodgrain to give it an authentic look.

 

Real or natural wood blinds offer a delicate elegance that makes them a firm favourite with interior designers. The porous wood aids a gentle diffusion of light flow when the slats are open, and a ‘glow’ effect when closed. Real wooden blinds are generally a little more expensive than faux wood venetian blinds. It is for their superior aesthetics and natural beauty that real wood blinds tend to be used in key receptions such as lounges and dining rooms.

 

Faux wood blinds are undoubtedly hardier than their wooden counterparts. Firmer, heavier and fully water-resistant, these offer more practicality for humid or high-intensity rooms such as bathrooms, kitchens or conservatories.

 

As two very different materials, there are several key differences between these blinds. Read our complete guide to real or faux wood blinds for the full lowdown.

 

Inside or Outside Mount

 

Inside or outside mount refers to whether the blind will be fitted within the window recess, or in front of it. Within the recess, fitting is more common, as it means the recess houses the blind neatly. Additionally, this style of placement obscures the ‘raw’ edges of real wood blinds, which some feel looks cleaner. 

 

Inside-recess blinds are popular as it enables the blind to be twinned with a curtain. In rooms that need a lot of shading options, such as bedrooms, this can be the ideal style. 

 

Sometimes a narrow recess or other obstruction such as an inward-opening window may prevent this. In this case, an outside-mount blind is the answer. An outside-mounted wooden blind will be bigger and slightly more expensive due to the extra materials required.

 

Whichever style you choose, it’s important to follow the correct measuring guidelines, and choose the right option at checkout. For inside-mount blinds follow our recess measuring instructions at the top of the how to measure for wooden blinds page, and choose ‘Recess’ when ordering. 

 

For outside-mount blinds follow our exact measuring instructions at the bottom of the how to measure for wooden blinds page, and choose ‘Exact’ when ordering. We’ve also included a quick guide on how to measure and install both types of wooden blinds below.

 

 

Image credit: @no34home on Instagram

Wooden Blinds by Room

 

Whether you’re into vertical blinds, roller blinds, Roman blinds or wooden blinds, choosing the perfect fit is all about the room you’re designing. While wood blinds are a great choice for rooms where you’ll receive guests, faux wood blinds are better suited to wetter environments. Here, we’ll show you how you can use blinds in different rooms.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    • Lounges and living rooms: Lounges, living rooms, and central receptions are the most common place you’ll find a wooden blind in the wild. The light flow and privacy options they offer are ideal for street-level rooms, and spaces that see a lot of daytime use. Wooden blinds with tapes are a popular style for reception rooms, and there is an emerging trend for complementary tapes, such as white blinds with black tapes.

 

    • Kitchens: Kitchens are another good option for wooden blinds, with brilliant pure white wooden blinds providing a perfect partner to soft white goods. While real wood is a common choice here, you may want to consider faux wood instead, particularly if your blinds are above the kitchen sink or another high-moisture area.

 

    • Bedrooms: Bedrooms are another style focal point in people’s homes, and therefore often a key site for this stylish blind style. Bedroom wooden blinds are not blackout blinds, so if this is a requirement in your bedroom you may wish to pair blinds with blackout curtains to enjoy the full spectrum of shading options.

 

  • Bathrooms: Bathrooms are an increasingly popular space for wooden blinds. Faux wood is your best bet for longevity here, as the PVC slats are both waterproof and easily cleaned. They give you the natural wood effect but are better able to stand up to moisture over time compared to real wood blinds.

 

How to Measure for Wooden Blinds

 

You’ll need a tape measure, pen and paper, and your chosen window. Before you begin, choose whether you want your window blind fitted inside the recess or outside the recess.

 

 

Measuring Inside the Recess 

 

Measure the recess three times — across the top, middle and bottom. Do not measure the window or the pane, but wall to wall. Note down your three measurements.

 

 

Repeat this process for the drop (or height) of the recess, measuring three times from ceiling to sill.

 

The smallest width and smallest drop measurement are the measurements you should input when ordering. 

 

Important note: When buying blinds for several windows, measure each recess separately even if your windows appear to be the same size.

 

Measuring Outside the Recess

 

It’s a little simpler to measure for outside the recess. Mark out where you want your blind to be installed on the wall (faintly), giving at least a 2-centimetre overlap on either side of the recess. Measure this length and note it down. Do not rub out your wall marking — you’ll need it when installing the blind.

 

Repeat this process for the drop (or height) of the recess, again overlapping each side of the recess by at least 2 centimetres. Again, use the smallest width and smallest drop measurement when ordering and make sure to measure each window separately.

 

Your Guide to Installing Wooden Blinds

 

Here is a step-by-step guide on how to hang wooden blinds. In addition to your made-to-measure blind, you will need a measuring tape, screws, rawl plugs, a screwdriver and a pencil.

 

Inside the Recess

 

Along with your wooden blind, you should have a pair of brackets and safety cleat. Wider blinds will also come with a central support bracket.

 

 

    1. Choose how you would like to install your blind. Your blind can be mounted ‘top fix’, meaning from above, or ‘side fix’, on the left and right of the window recess. We would recommend top fix as a default option.

 

    1. Take note of how far your window handles jut out. The back of your blind should sit just in front of this. Take note of any other obstructions that may affect the window depth.

 

    1. Your brackets are marked left and right for easy identification. Using your bracket as a template, circle inside where the screws should sit for each bracket, then drill into each hole. Pop a rawl plug into each hole, then line up each bracket and affix with screws using your screwdriver. Once installed, open each bracket ready for the blind.

 

    1. You may need to add a central support bracket on a wider wooden blind. If this is the case, install slightly off-centre and ensure the depth matches that of the bracket.

 

    1. Lift up your blind and push it into place, before closing the bracket on each side.

 

  1. Lastly, install the safety cleat. This needs to be installed toward the lower corner of your window recess, on the same side as your control handle. Using your cleat as a template, circle inside the two screw holes, then drill into each. Pop in your rawl plugs, then screw the safety cleat onto the wall.

 

Outside the Recess

 

Along with your wooden blind, you should have a pair of brackets and safety cleat. Wider blinds will also come with a central support bracket.

 

 

    1. Outside the recess blinds are installed in a ‘face fix’ style, meaning the screws go through the back of the bracket.

 

    1. Find the faint markings you made when measuring your window, or re-measure to the dimensions of your new blind, ensuring an even overlap on both sides of the recess.

 

    1. Your brackets are marked left and right for easy identification. Using your bracket as a template, circle inside where the screws should sit for each bracket, then drill into each hole. Pop a rawl plug into each hole, then line up each bracket and screw it on. Once installed, open each bracket ready for the blind.

 

    1. You may need to add a central support bracket on a wider wooden blind. If this is the case, install slightly off-centre.

 

    1. Lift up your blind and push it into place, before closing the bracket on each side.

 

    1. Lastly, install the safety cleat. This needs to be installed toward the lower corner of your wall, on the same side as your control handle. Ensure your control cord can reach the cleat before you begin.

 

  1. Using your cleat as a template, circle inside the two screw holes, then drill into each. Pop in your rawl plugs, then screw the safety cleat onto the wall.

 

Ordering Free Samples

 

Good-quality wooden blinds are a classic style choice and one that suits most homes. But you need not take our word for it — order up to 20 samples completely free to see the exact material, high quality and shades of our blinds. 

 

To order samples, select the ‘free sample’ option on any product on the wooden blinds category page, then select ‘order free samples’ once you have as many as you need. This will take you to an order page where you enter your address so we can post out your samples to you, first class.